Post-graduate (PG) education in pharmacology is aimed at creating specialists who can provide high-quality healthcare and contribute to scientific advancements through research and training. Pharmacology comprises both experimental and clinical sciences, and a competent medical pharmacologist should possess knowledge and skills in both areas. Experimental pharmacology is crucial for understanding drug action in diseases and developing new drugs, while clinical pharmacology is essential for prescribing practices, identifying adverse drug reactions, conducting clinical trials, and ensuring drug safety.

The job prospects for a medical pharmacologist are diverse and include academia, pharmaceutical industry/clinical research organizations, government research institutions, regulatory bodies, and scientific writing or management roles. Therefore, the PG pharmacology curriculum should prepare students to meet the requirements of these various job sectors.

The increasing number of students seeking postgraduate degrees and the applied nature of the discipline present challenges in maintaining academic standards and improving competency. The widening of discipline boundaries and the move towards integrated course structures also necessitate integration with other biomedical and clinical disciplines. Therefore, a pragmatic approach to PG pharmacology teaching in India is essential to address these challenges and facilitate a fresh curriculum design.

This document provides teachers and learners with illustrative guidelines to achieve defined outcomes through learning and assessment. Subject-content specialists prepared the document, and the Reconciliation Board of the Academic Committee has attempted to maintain uniformity without compromising the purpose and content of the document. Although some compromises were made in the syntax to preserve the purpose and content, the document retains the "domains of learning" under the heading "competencies."

In conclusion, the purpose of PG education in pharmacology is to create competent medical pharmacologists who can provide high-quality healthcare and contribute to scientific advancements through research and training. The PG pharmacology curriculum should prepare students to meet the diverse job requirements in academia, pharmaceutical industry/clinical research organizations, government research institutions, regulatory bodies, and scientific writing or management roles. A pragmatic approach to PG pharmacology teaching in India is essential to maintain academic standards, improve competency, and facilitate a fresh curriculum design.

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Program Objectives: 

 

The program objectives of MD Pharmacology are as follows:

  1. To provide a comprehensive understanding of the principles and practice of pharmacology, including the mechanisms of drug action, drug metabolism, and pharmacokinetics.

  2. To develop the skills required to evaluate drug efficacy and safety, design and conduct clinical trials, and interpret the results of clinical studies.

  3. To provide an in-depth understanding of the major drug classes and their clinical applications, including the treatment of common diseases and disorders.

  4. To develop an appreciation of the importance of pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction monitoring, and drug interactions.

  5. To develop research skills in pharmacology, including the design, implementation, and analysis of experimental studies.

  6. To prepare students for careers in academia, pharmaceutical industry/clinical research organizations, government research institutions, regulatory bodies, and scientific writing or management roles.

  7. To promote ethical conduct in pharmacological research and practice, including compliance with relevant regulations and guidelines.

Overall, the program aims to produce competent medical pharmacologists who can provide high-quality healthcare, advance the cause of science through research and training, and meet the diverse job requirements in the field of pharmacology.

 

The Team:

 

S.No FACULTY NAME  DESIGNATION
1 DR. SABORNI DEY PROFESSOR&HOD
2 DR. VIVEK TEJVIR YADAV ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
3 DR. MAMTA YADAV ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
4 DR. RAJNI KUMARI RAI ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
  DR. RAM AWTAR MANDA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
5 DR. MANISHA CHATTARJEE SENIOR RESIDENT

 

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Assessment:  

There shall be four theory papers (as per PG Regulations).

Paper I: Basic sciences as applied to Pharmacology

Paper II: Systemic Pharmacology

Paper III: Clinical Pharmacology, Experimentation, Research, Biostatistics and Education

Paper IV: Recent advances in Pharmacology.

 

Practical examination:  

Practical examination should be spread over two days and include various major components of the syllabus focusing mainly on the psychomotor domain.

 

Teaching and Learning Methods: 

 

Teaching and learning methods are crucial for any academic program to ensure the quality of education and knowledge acquisition. Some of the recommended teaching and learning methods for postgraduate students in the Department of Pharmacology are:

A. Lectures:

A minimum of 10 lectures per year is suggested.

Lectures can cover topics such as subject-related important topics, recent advances, research methodology, biostatistics, and teaching methodology.

No. 3, 4, 5 can be done in the course of research/biostatistics and medical education workshops.

B. Journal club:

A minimum of once in 1-2 weeks is suggested.

Topics will include presentation and critical appraisal of original research papers.

C. Student Seminar:

A minimum of once every 1-2 weeks is suggested.

Important topics should be selected as per subject requirements and allotted for in-depth study by a postgraduate student.

D. Student Symposium:

A minimum of once every 3 months is suggested.

A broad topic of significance should be selected, and each part shall be dealt by one postgraduate student.

E. Laboratory work / Bedside clinics:

Minimum once every 1-2 weeks.

Various methods like DOAP, simulations, and case-based discussions etc. are to be used.

F. Interdepartmental colloquium:

Faculty and students must attend monthly meetings between the Department of Pharmacology and another department or departments.

 

Career Prospective:

 

MD Pharmacology is a specialized medical field that deals with the study of drugs and their effects on living organisms. As an MD Pharmacologist, one can pursue a career in various areas such as academia, industry, research, and clinical practice. Here are some of the career prospects for MD Pharmacologists:

Academic positions: MD Pharmacologists can work as faculty members in medical colleges and universities. They can teach and conduct research in pharmacology, toxicology, and related areas.

Research positions: MD Pharmacologists can work in research organizations such as pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology firms, and government agencies. They can conduct research on new drug discovery, drug safety, and drug efficacy.

Clinical Pharmacology: Clinical Pharmacologists can work in hospitals or clinics to optimize drug therapy for patients. They are involved in designing and conducting clinical trials, interpreting drug-drug interactions, and evaluating the safety and efficacy of drugs.

Regulatory affairs: MD Pharmacologists can work in regulatory affairs in pharmaceutical companies or government agencies to ensure that drugs are safe, effective, and comply with regulations.

Medical writing: MD Pharmacologists can work as medical writers in pharmaceutical companies or contract research organizations. They can write scientific articles, clinical study reports, and regulatory documents.

Entrepreneurship: MD Pharmacologists can start their own consulting firms, contract research organizations, or pharmaceutical companies.

 

In conclusion, MD Pharmacology offers a wide range of career options in academia, research, clinical practice, regulatory affairs, medical writing, and entrepreneurship. The demand for MD Pharmacologists is expected to grow in the coming years due to the increasing complexity of drug development and the need for personalized medicine.