Majority of dental injuries involves tooth fractures in the front tooth region, especially in upper teeth due to their anatomical position. Anterior crown fractures lead to discomfort and serious psychological, esthetic, functional, and phonetic problems that can affect social relationships.

If the fracture is uncomplicated (i.e., not involving the pulp) and the pulpal health is uncompromised, it may be restored with composite resin or a jacket crown. In cases where the teeth are severely fractured, endodontic treatment and placement of intracanal posts become necessary, before crown restoration. A post and core crown is a type of dental restoration required where there is an inadequate amount of sound tooth structure remaining to retain a conventional crown. A post is cemented into a prepared root canal, which retains a core restoration, which retains the final crown. Post and cores are only placed in teeth that have already been root canal treated. And then, only for those that have large portions of natural tooth structure missing.


Basic steps involved in restoration of such badly broken tooth using post and core are as follows:

  • Root canal treatment of the broken tooth
  • Creating a post space. This space will lie within one of the tooth's root canals, which during its endodontic treatment was sealed by filling it in with the rubber-like compound gutta percha.
  • Once the space inside the tooth has been created, the endodontist must evaluate the fit of the post they plan to place.
  • Once the fit of the post has been checked, it's ready to be cemented in the root canal. This is a simple step. The chosen cement is prepared and slathered onto all sides of the post. The post is then teased into the tooth until that point where it's fully seated.
  • Once the post's cement has set, the tooth's core can be added.
  • Once the process of placing the post and core has been completed, the tooth's dental crown can be fabricated, just like for any tooth.